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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you for it, and it was really the way you did it. as i have said, my role in life is to be the grain of sand to the oyster. you irritates the oyster and out comes a pearl. i have been your grain of sand that you chose. it has been an honor to be your grain of sand in this process. we will continue to make pearls as necessary in the future. fair enough? [applause] the american people have spoken. they have chosen governor clinton. congratulations. >> boo! >> wait a minute. the only way we are going to make it work, if we all team up together. let's give governor clinton a big round of applause. but for get the election. forget the election. the hard work is in front of us. we must all work together to rebuild our great country. you, the
deeper, that fact into this plot tonight. joining us right now is "washington post" reporter sauer ri horowitz, and david woods senior military correspondent for "the huffington post." give me a sense, i don't want people to get lost before we start, let me take may own shot at this, how the whole thing is put together. let's watch. the messy and complex web begins with david petraeus. in 2006 petraeus meets paula broadwell, a west point graduate and doctoral student after giving a speech at harvard. fast forward to may of this year. another woman, jill kelley, a friend of petraeus and his wife, begins receiving harassing e-mails. she asks a friend at the fbi to help launch an investigation. the e-mails it is eventually discovered are being sent by broadwell. the fbi also discovers that broadwell and petraeus have been having an affair. meanwhile, the fbi agent who kelley approached gross frustrated after he's kept off the case. his supervisors reportedly are concerned that he has, quote, grown obsessed with the matter. it's also uncovered that he has sent shirtless photos of himself
a cushion going into the counties around washington. >> and the more suburban -- obama will get a big a big scor. >> we haven't seen the vote tallies in virginia. and joining us on set is the arcitect -- >> call me "winner" house races? your job was to protect the majority or grow this. is it possible the republicans may net seats? >> we will get them in non- traditional areas. we will get them because we fought hard. this means you get to do a lot of things you wouldn't normally do. one goal of mine, four years ago, was to make sure we were a national party with a national message, to sell thit that way. john boehner backed it up and eric cantor with a great job. >> early numbers from ohio and virginia, you may be one of the few happy republicans in tonigh. >> how do you feel about the washington. >> we put a lot of work into this. the rcc is about winning. cantor and boehner were with us -- winning back twice. you have to prove you can do it. >> for those watching, the congressman runs the campaign committee. controls the money that is spent -- what is one district you will win tonight th
from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is tough. he is a close contender. he has given credit for getting george bush elected in 2000. bbthe supreme court nominated george bush in 2000. since he has been in the white house has been brought about everything. he spent $300 million this year of other people's money. we do not know how much money he made for that deal. in nine senate races he got one win. he has spent maybe $170 million against barack obama and for mitt romney. he had a horrible record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous
of power." it's no longer forthcoming, it is here. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. good morning, andrea. >> hi there. >> john heilemann, it's been such a long, long road since you guys started reporting on president barack obama -- then-senator barack obama's first election campaign in 2007. here we are five years later, a very emotional moment for the president who has endured five years of the highest highs and the lowest lows in politics. this has to be one of the most special moments for the man. >> undoubtedly. you know, it will be -- you think about the significance of him winning the first time, obviously, an historic moment. but in a lot of ways, you know, if he had lost on tuesday night, there would have been a lot of people who kind of consigned that victory to an accident. >> he would have been an aberration of history. >> almost re-election means as much and maybe in some ways more than the first time, you know. he's not a guy given to public emotion, displays of emotion. back in 2008
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
shift. i remember when i came to washington in the 1980s, people were writing an article, i wrote an article for -- i wrote an article for -- remember that carline bowman -- was that public opinion? >> yeah, yeah. >> on the block, the electoral law, that there was a republican electoral law. i think you'll probably start to see people talk about a democratic electoral lock due to these changing demographics. so the hispanic numbers picked up, and we are seeing an electric whether democrats democrats are doing well among african-americans, hispanics, asians, younger voters and white liberals. and that, that needle appears to have moved slightly to the democrats so that if you have a kind of normal base election, the democrats have a very slight advantage. i think most people will say we will continue to grow over time, unless the republicans do something to make inroads among what now are becoming some poor democratic constituencies, at least some. but if you look at the house races, you have to be cautious about the big message you are drawing. if the democrats again what looks to
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
in bellingham, washington, good afternoon. please go ahead with your question or comment for steven johnson. >> caller: hi, pleasure speaking to you. 8, i was a first wave environmental planner back in the mid '70s, so i'dhead of your ghost -- i'd heard of your ghost maps story. and in -- after i graduated i thought i'd kick around the idea of architecture plus ecology and play with computer models and satellite data late at night without authorization. [laughter] before the term hacker or geospatial intelligence technology was invented. anyway, i became a mr. mom in '82 because that was really going nowhere. today, however, it looks like, you know, cloud technology and c factor computing and a lot of these breakthroughs are going to make three dimensional environmental computing feasible. the problem i saw then was a global vision in a flat world, you know? we didn't really have a three dimensional philosophy. to work with this new technology. and i don't even see it there now. and it's kind of a little troubling, you know? any comments, thoughts? thanks. >> guest: yeah, great. what an int
in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. again, technically, a superb operation, one to set the standard for future campaigns and now you identify your voters, encourage them to turn out, and perhaps some people think by the fourth or fifth visit or phone call verging on harassment to turn themçó out, t it worked. the point i want to make beyond that, howev
and republicans hold the house, washington on the morning after is going to look very much like washington the day before. >> of course, nicolle wallace who worked in the pal in/mccain campaign four years ago, george w. bush, the huge issue, overwhelming issue, the economy. that is the issue that mitt romney wanted to make his calling card. >> that's right. they are looking at the same information we're looking at as people are still voting, you know, they're hoping that's what they had in mind when they went to the polls day. they made a sales pitch that was 100% about voters being dissatisfied with the pace of recovery. that was the beginning, middle and end of mitt romney's pitch to the american people and they're on the same pins and needles we are to see if it worked. >> donna brazile, one thing we saw, the exitle pos and a surprise to me in the exit polls if we can pull it up now, we asked about the direction of the country and one thing that it showed, donna brazile, who worked for campaign manager for al gore back in 2000, a dramatic reduction over the last year in people who think the cou
of washington, d.c. and even in florida outside of tampa, they're seeing big turnout numbers there, too. they don't think he can get his 2008 turnout numbers but, scott, as you know tonight, it's going to be all about turnout. >> pelley: yes, it will, jan, thank you very much. the candidate who gets his voters to the polls is likely to win today. norah, turnout is everything and the electorate's been changing since 2008. >> it has. that's one of the things i'm going to be looking at tonight. not only how big is the turnout but the size of the electorate. the different democrat graphic groups. we saw as i pointed out during our evening news that 26% of the electorate in 2008 was a minority electorate. does that grow? does it stay the same or shrink? that will be part of it. the white vote which was about 73% of the vote where will that be tonight? it will speak to not only the changing nature of the country's electorate but also give us clues about which candidate is doing better. >> pelley: bob, the national polls over the last few days, dead heat. dead even for both candidates. it's re
of change, of course not produced the change in washington that he promised in 2008. still, he said his critics are vetting the people turned off by the partisanship of the past four years and depress the voter turnout and he rallied people to go to the polls, here is a bit of what he had to say. >> and that's why i need you, ohio to make sure their voices are heard, to make sure your voices are heard. i want to keep fighting for you, and we've come to far to turn back now. >> the president in mentor, ohio, tomorrow, in columbus, ohio, and we'll see you there. back to you in new york. >> steve: thank you very much. one of the things the president's team the thing that the president has for him is his likability. back in august the president of the united states was 50's oon mitt romney was 40's. according to the brand new washington abc poll, mitt romney and barack obama are currently tied in exactly the same likability. >> gretchen: you could attest to the debate performance for mitt romney would be the first indicator, probably the first one and the president has gone negative and tha
on the ballot in the november election. the system is p currently used in louisiana, washington state, and california. it is now a ballot member prop 21. what is your position on the top two primary system and why? >> we'll start with jill stein. >> thank you. and thank you so much to free & equal, and thank you for being here. i think top two does not enlarge our democracy. in many ways, it confuses things more. it puts many candidates onto the ballot all together, and it arbitrarily attaches party labels to them. any candidate can choose any label they want. so it really degrades the meaning of our political parties, where they have meaning, and i know they don't always, but there are some that do have meaning that aren't bought and sold to the highest bidder, and the green party is one of those parties. and i know there are some other parties here as well, the independent parties, where the parties actually represent real values. and the top two obscures the meaning of those parties, and it puts everyone together, so you really can't tell who is representing you, and whoever hats
around washington. on the other hand, the big strength for governor romney is down in coal country, down in southeastern virginia. then governor romney probably has a better chance around norfolk because of those defense issues down there that you just heard john dickerson talk about. so when we get a better feel as to where most of this vote is turning how the, we'll have a better feel as to whose actually ahead. >> pelley: nora, this gives canada them alot of confidence. >> virginia is key. they feel good about virginia because of that heavy turnout. those exit polls we talked about 52% of the electorate is female. it was actually 54% in 2008. these numbers can change a little bit but suggest the female vote is down a little bit. and one of the toughest fights we saw over women voters was actually in virginia. the after that debate where there was that discussion about binders full of women, romney immediately went on the air in virginia with an ad saying that he is for contraception and then obama came back with another ad contradicting that sniesmght thank yo.>> pelley: thank you .
in washington and certainly talk a lot about that during the conference, but i think the focus right now has to be dealing with this fiscal cliff and putting the competitive agenda in place and if we don't do that i believe that we will not be able to get the kind of economic recovery that we all hope for and that we have been lacking over the last few years. >> let me ask another question. i want to get to the agenda but address at least one more question about the campaign and the republican coalition and that is young people. a lot of discussion in the press the last week or so that you didn't make as many as you thought you would despite the fact a lot of them are living at home and there's not a great job market for them and the president still has about 60% of that vote. is this partly a cultural issue message? is gay marriage for example one of those threshold issues now that makes the republican party look out of touch with those voters? and you have to change that gave republicans talk about that issue? >> yeah. [laughter] >> that's a very big concession because a lot of the colleag
of those issues and all of them talk about what's wrong with washington and what could make it work better. we're back in democracy plaza with our saturday panel and some of the stranger ways to predict who will win on tuesday. you're watching a special primetime edition of "the daily rundown." we'll be right back. ♪ if you are one of the millions of men who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men w
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)